The Easter-Ostara Connection

Easter is a widely celebrated holiday in the Christian tradition, commemorating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. However, the origins of Easter can be traced back to pre-Christian pagan traditions, specifically the celebration of the spring equinox. The Easter Ostara connection. One of the most prominent pagan celebrations of the spring equinox was the festival of Ostara, which was named after the Germanic goddess of spring and fertility.

Ostara was a prominent figure in Germanic mythology, and was associated with the rebirth and renewal of nature in the springtime. Her name is also thought to be related to the word “east”, as the spring equinox marks the point at which the sun rises due east.

The festival of Ostara was typically celebrated on or around the spring equinox, which falls around March 20th or 21st each year in the Northern Hemisphere. It was a time of great celebration, as it marked the end of the long, dark winter months and the beginning of the lighter, warmer days of spring.

Many of the traditions associated with Easter can be traced back to the festival of Ostara. For example, the tradition of decorating eggs can be traced back to the pagan belief that eggs were a symbol of fertility and new life. The egg was also seen as a representation of the potential for new beginnings, just as the springtime represented a time of new growth and renewal.

Another tradition that can be traced back to the festival of Ostara is the use of the hare or rabbit as a symbol of fertility. In Germanic mythology, the hare was associated with Ostara, as it was believed to be a symbol of fertility and new life.

Interestingly, the connection between Easter and Ostara can also be traced back to the goddess Ishtar, who was worshipped in ancient Babylon. Ishtar was a goddess of fertility, love, and war, and was associated with the planet Venus. She was also associated with the springtime, as it was believed that she would descend into the underworld during the winter months and then emerge again in the spring, bringing with her new life and fertility.

Over time, the celebration of the spring equinox and the goddesses associated with it were absorbed into Christian tradition, and the holiday of Easter was born. However, many of the pagan traditions and symbols associated with the spring equinox and the goddesses of fertility and new life still remain a part of Easter celebrations today.

Easter and Ostara can be traced back to the pagan celebrations of the spring equinox and the goddesses of fertility and renewal that were worshipped during this time. The goddess Ostara, who was associated with the rebirth and renewal of nature, was a prominent figure in Germanic mythology and her name was given to the festival that was celebrated around the spring equinox.

Many of the traditions associated with Easter, such as the use of eggs and rabbits as symbols of fertility, can be traced back to the pagan beliefs and practices of the festival of Ostara. In addition, the goddess Ishtar, who was worshipped in ancient Babylon and associated with the springtime and fertility, also played a role in the development of the Easter holiday.

While Easter is now primarily celebrated in the Christian tradition as a commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, the pagan roots of the holiday are still evident in many of the symbols and traditions that are associated with it. The connection between Easter and Ostara is a reminder that many of our holiday traditions have deep roots in ancient pagan beliefs and practices, and that these traditions continue to influence our celebrations and rituals today.